Manischewitz Ice Cream

Manischewitz Ice Cream

It’s officially Rosh Hashanah season! What’s Rosh Hashanah you may ask? It’s the Jewish New Year. Very similar to secular New Year’s, but with less Andre and making out with strangers. And a whole lot more apples and honey. But it’s fun I swear! When some people start planning for the Jew year, they may thumb through brisket recipes, or potato kugel, or apple cakes. But my mind goes straight to booze. You’re welcome. I’ve been wanting to make ice cream forever, but what flavor would be the Jewiest? Beet? Pomegranate? Lox? Manischewitz? Oh bingo. The wine of Bar Mitzvah’s past. This ice cream is a little sweet, a little boozy, and a whole lot of perfect for any holiday!

Manischewitz Ice CreamHere’s what Jew do. In a medium saucepan, bring the Manischewitz to a boil with the cinnamon sticks. Reduce to a simmer and simmer until it is reduced to 1 cup, about 30-40 minutes. Meanwhile. in a metal bowl, beat the egg yolks until they lighten in color. Set aside. In a separate large saucepan, combine the cream, milk, sugar and vanilla and bring to a boil and then turn off the heat. Temper hot liquid into the egg yolks by adding a little at a time and mixing as to not cook the eggs. Return the whole mixture to the cream saucepan and cook over medium heat until the custard is thick, about 10 minutes. Make sure not to let the mixture boil or it will curdle.

Manischewitz Ice Cream

Strain the custard into a bowl and stir in the reduced Manischewitz. Stir in the red wine. Cover and freeze for 30 minutes until chilled. Freeze in an ice cream freezer according to the manufacturer’s instructions and then freeze at least two hours until ready to serve.

Manischewitz Ice Cream

Oh man.

Manischewitz Ice Cream

Perfect for the traditional Rosh Hashanah ice cream sundaes Bubbe always made. Or just for noshing.

Manischewitz Ice Cream 5

Top it with honey and pomegranate seeds for a super Rosh Hashanah dessert. Or eat out of the container like I did. All class all the time.

Manischewitz Ice Cream

Manischewitz Ice Cream
 
Prep time
Cook time
Total time
 
Use your favorite sweet wine to make boozy Manischewitz Ice Cream!
Author:
Recipe type: Dessert
Cuisine: Jewish
Serves: 8
Ingredients
  • 1 bottle Manischewitz
  • 2 cinnamon sticks
  • 6 large egg yolks
  • 2 cups half and half
  • 1 cup milk (I used 2%)
  • ½ cup sugar
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla extract
Instructions
  1. In a medium saucepan, bring the Manischewitz to a boil with the cinnamon sticks. Reduce to a simmer and simmer until it is reduced to 1 cup, about 30-40 minutes.
  2. Meanwhile. in a metal bowl, beat the egg yolks until they lighten in color. Set aside.
  3. In a separate large saucepan, combine the cream, milk, sugar and vanilla and bring to a boil and then turn off the heat. Temper hot liquid into the egg yolks by adding a little at a time and mixing as to not cook the eggs. Return the whole mixture to the cream saucepan and cook over medium heat until the custard is thick, about 10 minutes. Make sure not to let the mixture boil or it will curdle.
  4. Strain the custard into a bowl and stir in the reduced Manischewitz.
  5. Cover and freeze for 30 minutes up to overnight until chilled. Then freeze in your ice cream maker according to the directions and then freeze at least two hours until ready to serve.
Notes
Cook time does not include freezing time.

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Comments

  1. Bringing the wine to a boil will boil off all the alcohol, which is volatile. Better to boil a little water with the cinnamon, cool that, and add the wine after. Good idea, in general. I always thought of Manischewitz as more dessert than wine anyway.

  2. Amy-
    What size bottle of wine did you use? I think I have to try this!

  3. Hi Amy, I’ve never been to your blog before but happened to see your post on another site and was intrigued by the title.

    Very interesting ice cream. Having grown up on Manischewitz this sounds like a fun twist on ice cream for the upcoming holidays. There’s another wine I used last year, which I can’t recall, that has hints of orange in it as well.

    Fun blog with lots of great recipes that I grew up with as well. I learned most from my grandmother sitting around the kitchen table with her making kreplach and vranicla (not sure of the spelling) and matzo ball soup. Our favorite though was grevin which of course we avoid now but would snack on like they were potato chips. Goodness knows how we all didn’t die at any early age. Comfort food at its best.

    Thanks for sharing!

  4. juanitascocina says:

    This = the best way to put Manischewitz into your body evah!

  5. It really looks amazing! I’ve only had this wine once or twice, when Jewish friends have offered me a bit. Maybe if my friend has another Seder for us I’ll surprise everyone with this :)

  6. Aha! I knew that ersatz “wine” was good for *something*! ;-)

  7. I think you’ve created the one and only way I’ll ever consume Manischewitz! Absolutely genius!

  8. I am in no way ready for Rosh Hashanah or back to school or anything else fallish. Had to laugh at the Manischewitz ice cream though.

  9. How creative!! I love manischewitz and what an incredibly unique ice cream flavor. Oh and adore the idea of topping with honey and pomegranate seeds. So yummy!

  10. So luscious and creamy!!! And your sense of humor cracks me up! Love reading your posts :)

  11. When I was a kid I LOVED Manischewitz. I am so intrigued by this ice cream!

  12. Okay, this flavor is too much fun! I love the color the Manischewitz adds. Aaaaand, I probably won’t be able to stop thinking about it until I’ve tried it for myself.

  13. Awesome! I just got an ice cream maker at my bridal shower, and even though I’m not Jewish (and have never had Manischewitz!) I might have to try this myself! I love the honey and pom seeds topping idea too! Love your blog!

  14. Mazel Tov Amy for creating a blissfully guilt-free treat for the Rosh Hashanah season.

    P.s. I admire and appreciate your stellar humour and wit, too =)

  15. This is a great idea! I love your new twist on a Rosh Hashanah classic. And I’ll bet the alcohol in the wine keeps the ice cream nice and soft, too. :) Happy (early) new year!

  16. Colombia88 says:

    Hi Amy,
    If we dont have an ice cream maker, is there another option to make it? I really want to make this for my family next week!

  17. Hi Amy! I came across your blog when Buzzfeed featured this recipe, and I was basically obsessing over it until I tried making it tonight!

    I followed the directions very carefully, but I’m having one of those nights where it’s a not-so-comedic comedy of errors in my kitchen. (I made caramelized apples to put under the ice cream, and just ruined the whole batch through a series of unfortunate events– and that’s only one example! I’m usually a good cook, I promise.) Anywho, with the ice cream, it is absolutely not freezing in the ice cream maker at all. I chilled it for an hour before putting it in the ice cream maker, my ice cream bowl was in the freezer for two days, etc., but 30 minutes later, it was still completely liquid.

    Any ideas on how to fix the problem? I promised my aunt I would bring this for Yom Kippur pre-fast dinner tomorrow, so I’m still hoping to make it work! (Plus I promised another aunt I’d bring it to break fast, so I’d like to not repeat the same whatever-problem-this-is.) Any help would be much appreciated!

    Thanks,
    Archie

    • Hi Archie! Sorry to hear you are having trouble! Maybe your freezer is not cold enough? I could try chilling the ice cream mixture longer until it is super chilled before putting it in the ice cream maker. Try overnight and see what happens. Let me know!

  18. I just put mine in the freezer to chill overnight! I did run into a snag though, and this could be due to inexperience or never reducing alcohol in cooking before. I used the regular 750ml bottle of manischwitz, but after reducing for an hour there was still about 2 cups. And are the cinnamon sticks supposed to be gone or melt or do you just remove them? I tried google but couldn’t really find anything. I just put about 1 1/2 cups of the manischwitz into my custard mix because I didn’t want it to end up being to liquidy but what do you think?

    • Reducing an be tricky- sometimes it takes longer than expected due to conditions. I made mine in the summer when my house was hotter so it could evaporate quicker. Reducing it just intensifies the flavor, so I think you did the right thing!! Let me know how it goes!

Trackbacks

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