Challah

Lately, I have been reminiscing back on my youth a bit and wondering how on earth I got to be 25 28 already. Perhaps it was the time I spent last weekend living it up on Austin’s East 6th Street, (affectionately known as Dirty 6th) that made me realize I am no longer 20. But mostly, how is it not 1993 and I am not catching up on Rugrats specials on the ole VCR noshing on Fruit by the Foot? Where does the time go? When I haven’t been daydreaming of raiding fellow Jew Cher Horowitz’s closet, I have been thinking about comfort food. Nothing makes you feel better about realizing kids born in the 1990s are old enough to be in Med School than a nice dish just like Bubbe used to make it. Well, that and still getting carded. And realizing that said kids missed one of the greatest decades of music (arguably) in recent history. I know I would be half the woman I am today without Wilson Phillips and the Gin Blossoms. Anyhoo, my go to comfort food is usually Matzah Ball Soup, but with summer setting in in Texas, I went with my second favorite- challah. Now that Passover is over, onto some bread!! Challah is an eggy Jew bread traditionally served on Shabbat and holidays, or to make the best sandwiches you have ever had. I promise. Let’s get cooking, shall we?

Here is all you need to make your own challah. I gave this recipe from Epicurious a try.


First, prepare the yeast by mixing the yeast with warm water and 1 tablespoon sugar and whisk until smooth. Let yeast stand until it puffs up, about 10 minutes.

Whisk in the two eggs, oil, salt and remaining sugar into yeast mixture until incorporated. Then add the of flour and mix into a ball. Knead until smooth, about 5-10 minutes.

Place the dough in a warm, cleaned bowl and cover with plastic wrap. Let the dough ferment until it has doubled in size, about two hours.

Line a baking sheet with parchment paper and divide your dough into two pieces. I went with a classic three strand braid, but YouTube has some fantastic tutorials if you want to try other braids. Divide one of the pieces of dough into three more pieces and roll each one out into a flat piece.

challah
Starting with the small end, roll each piece up into a strand making sure not to create air bubbles. Braid that sucker up starting in the middle. Repeat with the other piece of dough.


Cover the loafs with plastic wrap and let proof until tripled in size, about 1.5 hours. Glaze the breads with the last egg and bake for 35 minutes at 350 degrees.


Enjoy for sandwiches, on its own, or for a special recipe I have coming up next week! Any guesses??

Challah from Epicurious

Challah
 
Prep time
Cook time
Total time
 
Challah back!
Author:
Recipe type: Bread
Cuisine: Jewish
Serves: 2 challahs
Ingredients
  • 1 envelope instant yeast
  • ¾ cup warm water (about 100 degrees)
  • ¼ cup sugar
  • 2 large eggs plus one for glazing
  • ½ cup vegetable oil
  • 1½ teaspoons salt
  • 3¾ cups bread flour
Instructions
  1. First, prepare the yeast by mixing the yeast with warm water and 1 tablespoon sugar and whisk until smooth. Let yeast stand until it puffs up, about 10 minutes.
  2. Whisk in the two eggs, oil, salt and remaining sugar into yeast mixture until incorporated. Then add the of flour and mix into a ball. Knead until smooth, about 5-10 minutes.
  3. Place the dough in a warm, cleaned bowl and cover with plastic wrap. Let the dough ferment until it has doubled in size, about two hours.
  4. Line a baking sheet with parchment paper and divide your dough into two pieces.
  5. For a three strand braid divide one of the pieces of dough into three more pieces and roll each one out into a flat piece.
  6. Starting with the small end, roll each piece up into a strand. Braid that sucker up starting in the middle.
  7. Repeat with the other piece of dough.
  8. Cover the loafs with plastic wrap and let proof until tripled in size, about 1.5 hours.
  9. Glaze the breads with the last egg and bake for 35 minutes at 350 degrees.

 

 

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Comments

  1. Bubbe says

    YUM YUM YUM!!!!! Nothing like a little challah to go with my butter :). You continue to outshine every generation of the family. I want to wrap my flapping arms around you and give you a big hug!

    Love,

    Bube

  2. says

    This challah looks like a work of art…Challah is my favorite bread-I eat it like cake!..I can’t wait until I have the summer off to bake this.

    • says

      Amazing! Nice to meet you Amy. You blog looks great too and that challah bread pudding?? I die! I need that in my life pronto.

  3. says

    Your challah looks amazing. Soul satisfying and delicious.

    I grew up on MIami beach and have a profound appreciation for jewish inspired dishes.

    Awesome.

    Velva

  4. Courtney says

    This looks awesome. My stepdad is Jewish and this year we couldn’t find any candles for the menorah : ( so I want to find other ways of acknowledging Chanukah. I love your headline, BTW; my mom & I always sub “you” with “Jew” when we’re talking to him
    X D

    Thanks!

    • says

      Thanks, Courtney! So sad you could not find candles, maybe you could order some online for future Hanukkahs? HAHA subbing “Jew” with “you” never gets old for me. Happy Hanukkah to Jew and your family!

  5. Kristin says

    This was my first attempt at baking bread from scratch and it came out perfectly! My family loved it. We’re going to use it for french toast as well. Thanks for the recipe!

  6. Katie says

    This actually worked!!! Usually I have so many struggles with bread/yeast recipes but this was a fabulous recipe and perfect for Hanukkah. Now I am no longer scared to bake breads, THANK YOU!

  7. Earl says

    Gonna try this recipe.It will be my first time trying to make bread. I heard the best french toast is made with challah :)

  8. Nat says

    Hi Amy! I made this with the 9 grams of dry active yeast and the challah tasted so yummy but mine were a little flat after I brushed the egg on and after baking they were still flat, do you know what may have caused this? What did I do wrong??? Did I leave them too long to rise maybe? Thanks

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