Pickled Rainier Cherries

If there is one food Jews love, it’s pickled stuff. And bagels, and rugelach, and kugel. Okay lots of things!

Pickled Rainier Cherries

Fact: Jews love pickled things. Back in college, my roommate Orly made sure she always had the staples in our refrigerator: tube of cookie dough, rainbow frosting in a can, leftover Chinese food, and a huge jar of pickles. I thought this was normal. Though I also thought watching The OC religiously and keeping a keg in your kitchen for kicks was normal. If that says something about my college experience.

Truthfully, I never loved the jarred stuff. Too salty! But my experiments with homemade pickles, pickled jalapeños, and fermented cabbage have turned out awesome! Why not pickled cherries?

I used to have a cherry painting in my bedroom back when I moved to Austin. I remember the first time my Mom visited she saw it and said, “Well, at least there is one cherry in your bedroom!” I was slightly embarrassed (what does that even mean??!! Oh.) but more impressed than anything. Turns out I do have a similar sense of humor as my mom! Well played, Mom. Well played.

Aaaanyway. So when Whole Foods invited me to a cherry class featuring local jam connoisseurs Confituras, I was in! Especially once I heard pickled cherries was involved. Doesn’t that sound good?! They are good! We also made Cherry Pit Syrup and Cocktail Cherries but these tangy Pickled Rainier Cherries stood out to me. I could eat them by the handful! They are easy to do too. You can trim the cherry stems, or not. Pit them, or not. See, easy!

Pickled Rainier Cherries

In a medium saucepan, bring vinegar, sugar, salt, a few springs of tarragon and 1 tablespoon of peppercorns to a boil. Reduce the heat, simmer until the sugar and salt dissolve and set aside to cool. Meanwhile, load the cherries into a glass jar with 10-12 peppercorns and a few sprigs of tarragon. Pour the cooled brine over the cherries to cover, place on lid and refrigerate.

Pickled Rainier Cherries

After a few days (I waited a week), your cherries are ready!! (!!!) Yay. You can keep them in the fridge for up to a year, if you don’t gobble them before then. Now, what to do with your cherries besides eat them by the handful? They are delicious paired with an epic cheese platter. Or do what I did, and top a piece of steak with your cherries and thank me later.

Pickled Rainier Cherries

Helloooo Summer! If you’re wondering if I used some of the pickling liquid and olive oil to dress my salad, you bet your tuchas I did!

Pickled Rainier Cherries

What would you do with your cherries? ;)

Pickled Rainier Cherries

Pickled Rainier Cherries
 
Prep time
Cook time
Total time
 
If there is one food Jews love, it’s pickled stuff. And bagels, and rugelach, and kugel. Okay lots of things!
Author:
Recipe type: Side Dish
Serves: 3-4 8 oz jars
Ingredients
  • 1 pound (about 50) Rainier cherries, stems trimmed to ½ inch, pitting optional
  • 2 cups white wine vinegar
  • 1½ cups sugar (or less)
  • Pinch kosher salt
  • 1 small bunch tarragon
  • 2 tablespoons pink peppercorns, divided (I used rainbow peppercorns)
Instructions
  1. In a medium saucepan, bring vinegar, sugar, salt, a few springs of tarragon and 1 tablespoon of peppercorns to a boil.
  2. Reduce the heat, simmer until the sugar and salt dissolve and set aside to cool.
  3. Meanwhile, load the cherries into a glass jar(s) with 10-12 peppercorns and a few sprigs of tarragon. Pour the cooled brine over the cherries to cover them, place the lid on and refrigerate.
  4. After a few days (I waited a week), your cherries are ready!! (!!!) Yay. You can keep them in the fridge for up to a year, if you don’t gobble them before then.
Notes
You can easily halve this recipe, but I don't recommend it!

 

Recipe reprinted with permission of Whole Foods.

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Comments

  1. I have to admit, when pinning I wasn’t quite sure what category these fell under…but they do look beautiful! I’ve never been a huge fan of the store bought stuff either, but we pickle jalapenos and other chilies quite frequently in our house, often adding carrots and onions…which always hit the spot! Yay for kids who inherit their parents sense of humor;)

  2. I’m so trying these. I made one of your dishes a while back – it was maybe eggplant or squash with farro and other goodies and pickled jalapenos on top. I loved those fricking jalapenos so much I make them all the time just to keep in the fridge – so good on a chicken cheese steak! Anyway, these cherries have to be amazing. Great idea!

  3. I’m the founder/moderator for Punk Domestics (www.punkdomestics.com), a community site for those of use obsessed with, er, interested in DIY food. It’s sort of like Tastespotting, but specific to the niche. I’d love for you to submit this to the site. Good stuff!

  4. Veronica says:

    I have an abundance of bing cherries, could I use those instead ?

  5. could you use any other kind of fruit?

  6. Can this recipe be heat processed and kept on a shelf rather than refrigerating? Like when canning jam.

  7. they sound wonderful with Ham pork or chicken I would eat them also with fresh nectarines and cheese mmmm

  8. I’ve never thought about pickling cherries, but what a great idea. Such a pretty garnish, and I bet they taste delicious!

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